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MYRTILLOCACTUS GRAFTED

MYRTILLOCACTUS SPECIES

Myrtillocactus species was founded in Mexico to Guatemala. There are 4 known species plus the Japanese cultivars that grow tree-like plants that branch with (4-8) prominent ribs. The largest plant in this genus grows to about 5 meters tall. Matured species bloom in summer will have greenish-white flowers that will produce blueberries which are eaten as a snack in Mexico. 

Semi-hardy varieties which can tolerate light frost. Well-drained soil and watering allow it to dry out. Keep the soil completely dry in winter. Plenty of space big-sized species need for their roots, and also repotting should be done every other year or when the myrtillocactus has outgrown its pot. Myrtillocactus require a good deal of sunlight when they are mature. But young keep it in a light shade area away from full light.

MYRTILLOCACTUS SPECIES

Myrtillocactus cochal

It forms into a large shrub with many compacts, candelabra-like forms, and also a short woody trunk.

MYRTILLOCACTUS SPECIES

Myrtillocactus Geometrizan (Blue Myrtil-cactus)

The Blue Myrtil-cactus is a more common species as it is used for understocks for grafting. This shrub forms into a dense growth of stems growing closely together. Excellent strong stock plant and also easy to grow. As for its endurance to feed the top variety for a long time before grafting again.

Myrtillocactus Geometrizans ‘Fukurokuryuzinboku’

The Booby Cactus is rare cactus and also hard to find. Myrtillocactus has more unusual, shaped ribs along with areoles that resemble nipples making this plant appear like it has little breasts in appearance. Nicknamed as The Booby Cactus or Titty Cactus. Japanese cultivars can get larger up to 4.5 meters high.

Japanese cultivar needs more care with them. Because of its shape and body appearance, it requires protection from the harsh conditions that could happen. Lots of drainages are required.

Ideal for pots or any garden because of its shape and color. The flowers they produce are small in relation to the stem, greenish-white. They do bloom even though I haven’t seen them yet. But if you do happen to get yours to flower, please send me a photo.

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