family and species

HAWORTHIA COOPERI SSP TRUNCATA

HAWORTHIA SPECIES

Native to South-Africa Mainly houseplants as they are small attractive. They are low-growing plants most will form rosettes with thick fleshy leaves into a rosette shape. Small sizes, patterned leaves, color, (usually green but sometimes brownish), and different forms. Some are covered with white pearly warts or bands giving them a distinctive appearance.  Can change …

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mammillaria bocasana v multilanata

MAMMILLARIA SPECIES

About 200 to 300 species, Native Mexico, Southwest United States, The Caribbean, Colombia, Venezuela, Guatemala, and Honduras. Common names are Pincushion cactus, Nipple Cactus, Fishhook, or Bird’s Nest Cactus. These species are globose or ball-shaped which grow either solitary or in clumps. The spines variety from stiff, stout, bristle-like, hair-like, comb-like, wool and come in …

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AGAVES SPECIES

About 200 species in this family. Mainly native to arid and semiarid regions of the Americas, particularly Mexico, and the Caribbean. A number of species are grown as ornamentals in desert landscaping.   They are spectacular rosettes type plants that vary in sizes. It has a spectacular flower spike from the centre of the rosette. …

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CONOPHYTUM MINUSCULUM SSP.

CONOPHYTUM SPECIES

Native to South Africa and Namibian. They are small compact, dwarf cushion forming, single bodied, textures, colour, with leaves. The leaves partially or entirely fused along with their centres. Each pair of leaves together prefer as one body. Bodies can be conical, oblong, or cylindrical. spotted or lined, velvety, warty, or windowed, and range in …

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LEDEBOURIA MACULATA

Plant of the Week LEDEBOURIA MACULATA

The genus Ledebouria is named after Carl Friedrich van Ledebour (1785-1851) German botanist and professor of botany at Dorpat. Native across sub-Saharan Africa, with a few species in Madagascar and India. There are approximately 90 species in all. This wonderful, attractive, small but hardy, previously known as Drimiopsis maculata, is tolerant of neglect and fairly easy to grow, …

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